Tokemo.com: Review of Tokemo.com

Tokemo.com: Review of Tokemo.com

The Tokemo.com website review was originally published in Dulaboo.comI used to write for the said website before my contract expired. Republishing here for archiving purposes. Edited to suit Yoast’s requirements.

As I was browsing through a list of nice websites from which I can learn Japanese for free, I can’t help but notice the ads that come with the search results too.

Companies today piggyback on certain search results too as long as it matches the items that you are searching for online. And when I took a chance at one of these ads, I chose Tokemo.com.

Tokemo.com

It slightly reminded me of how I stumbled upon Ouino on YouTube then. And this time around I realized that this method of advertising services online helps software reviewers like us to get better access to more language software programs and online tutorials.

On the other hand, it got me thinking:
Is Tokemo.com as good as they are advertised?

Tokemo.com

Most of the time, it’s a tough call knowing that most advertised services offer them for a fee. But some websites like Tokemo.com make an effort to offer sample lessons to give their prospects an idea on how they work. It’s hard to pitch a product when not much information is shared in terms of usage and utility, right?

Tokemo.com

Now in terms of basic greetings in Japanese, the samples offered tutorials with the help of flashcards that come with audio recordings. Software language tutorials work best when it comes with audio samplings too. With Tokemo.com, they included the audio with the sample lessons too.

Tokemo.com

I can’t help but notice the phonetically spelled pronunciation above the English word or expression taught. They transliterated the Japanese expression in a way that demonstrates how the word or expression should be pronounced.

For example, “My” is translated as “Watashee no”.

It is quite unique compared to the other transliterated Japanese words that I have seen in the past where the long vowel sound “ee” is simply written in the transliterated version as “Watashi no”, not “Watashee no”. Perhaps this is Tokemo.com‘s phonetic approach in teaching the language.

Tokemo.com

It can be confusing at some point since Tokemo.com did not separate the syllables per slashes so that the online learner could have an idea how to say the word better.

For example here “Oyasoomeenasaee” end up looking like one long word. Although the audio clip on how that word can be pronounced is heard, the audio clip doesn’t repeat itself in an effort to help you correct your diction.

It’s like seeing this word and learning to say it once without getting a chance to correct yourself while saying this word. Worse, you realize that it’s not a word but a sentence that Tokemo.com wrote without slashes thinking that you’d end up learning the word this way.

Tokemo.com

I hope the premium version offers a slashed syllabic demonstrated of the words apart from some repeated audio recordings in an effort to teach Japanese to as many folks as possible.

I appreciate the unlimited access to online lessons and other learning paraphernalia. But if ever they would really teach Japanese a comprehensive way that they can offer best, I hope it can be done right without having to get some students confused with the way some Japanese words are written in the transliterated sense.

Tokemo.com

Tokemo.com promised though that whoever signs up for their language software program would learn not only the basics but everything. They even presented the lessons that can be learned in menu form.

The presentation is an assurance that whatever is listed is sure to be taught in this website. Truth be told, I consider this to be a nice reference to use to set one’s expectations in learning Japanese from Tokemo.com

Tokemo.com

Tokemo.com’s flashcards have a printable version that you can print straight on a cardboard to be cut out later. This is a nice touch of learning Japanese offline.

I would recommend this to online learners who have reached at least intermediate level in terms of learning the language since this would mean they would not be so surprised at how the transliterated words would be written here.  

Some beginners like me who would like to learn the language found the way some words are written as distracting. I hope the premium version’s language lessons would not look that way.

As of this writing, Tokemo.com does not exist in any form whether as a website that provides Japanese lessons online or as an app or as a website in general.

Search results keep redirecting me to other sites that sound like Tokemo. Whether they plan to return offering a different service has yet to be seen.

What niche should you choose? Freelance Specialization Finder!

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